Redeemed

By Reba Phelps

Around the age of 5-years-old I had a new dress.This dress is still etched in my memory today, almost as if it still hangs in my closet. This floral dress was so special to me because it had an appliqué of a horse at the bottom. It was so majestic in my eyes because this horse had a mane that was made of yarn and this yarn offered hours of distraction, or horseplay, if you will.

I could run my fingers through many of them at one time and pretend I was wearing rings. I could tie the mane into knots. I could untie those knots and tug on them mercilessly until it they were barely hanging on.

The purchase of this dress was genius on my mother’s part. It kept me totally occupied while I attended court with my father.

I was way too young at the time to wonder what my dad had done wrong, why he was incarcerated and why he wasn’t coming home for a while. The only other memory I have was that community people gave our family Christmas presents. I remember thinking it was odd that Santa didn’t come that year but people did.

My dad started his criminal proceedings with a court appointed attorney who, for the life of him, couldn’t even remember his name. Sometime right after he was jailed he was randomly visited by an attorney who seemed to think he could win the case for him and have him home soon with his family. The young and fresh out of law school attorney also thought it would look really good if the children attended court on occasion during his trial. It is much harder to keep a man in jail who has small children at home.

Especially cute children, like his.

After six months in jail and a jury trial he was released from jail and we relocated to Natchitoches Parish.

One would have thought that he found Jesus in a jail cell like so many of the incarcerated do. Not my strong willed dad. He had a few more years of less than perfect choices and trying to live life on his terms before my mother gave him a chance to redeem himself for drinking away his paychecks.

My mother had been invited to church by a new friend of hers and she began attending with her children in tow. At the time the church was located in the Art Guild Building on Second Street, almost directly across from the Catholic Church we previously attended.

My dad’s only choice was to attend church with his family that day or leave the residence. He thought the punishment did not fit the crime but he reluctantly made an appearance at church on that Mother’s Day. Life for him changed that day as he accepted Jesus as his Lord and Savior.

Our family never hid the fact that my dad once served time. Some years later it would become the backbone of his testimony when he surrendered his life to the ministry and became a preacher. He would eventually begin his full-time ministry in Goldonna as Pastor of River of Life Church in 1987.

There is not a Sunday that goes by that he does not thank God and give him credit for redeeming him and saving his soul.

Looking back, these events did help shape the adult that I would become. One of the first charities I ever donated to was called, “Angel Tree Christmas- Prison Fellowship”, which gives Christmas presents to children of prisoners. It took many years for it to soak in that someone purchased Christmas presents for us because our dad was in jail.

Years later while attending a fundraiser in Sabine Parish, God allowed me to cross paths with this attorney whose name I had heard hundreds of times previously. My parents always said they didn’t know if our lives would have had the same outcome had this attorney not volunteered to help my dad.

Once I saw him, I introduced myself, and followed up with, “You represented my dad when you were younger and just starting out.” He immediately remembered the case and vividly remembered my dad. I have no idea why I needed to have that conversation with him other than to thank him for everything he did for my family and thank him for believing in my dad.

I shall never forget the words he said to me. “Your dad was a good man who was in the wrong place at the wrong time.”

I knew God had redeemed my dad and saved him but there was probably a small part of me that needed to hear that as well.

Some may read this and feel as if this was a complete overshare. My prayer is that someone will read it and know that God has redeeming power. He can forgive anyone for anything. He can use the least of them and use sinners for great things.

He can put random people in your path to help you along your journey and they may not even realize it until decades later.

He can make beauty out of ashes. I am very proud that my dad has lived a life for Christ for over 34 years now and has been responsible for leading many people to the Lord. His church recently suffered major damage due to a storm but he and his congregation are excited to see what mighty works his hand can do with the rubble.

“Let the redeemed of the Lord tell their story— those he redeemed from the hand of the foe.”  –  Psalm 107:2


Southern Scripts announces promotion of Stacy Lambert to Vice President of Client Services

Southern Scripts is proud to announce the promotion of Stacy Lambert to Vice President of Client Services. Stacy has been a vital member of the Southern Scripts team for four years. She began her career as Southern Scripts’ very first account executive.

“Stacy has always shown tremendous initiative in the performance of her duties, always going above and beyond what is expected of her and lending a helping hand wherever she can. From day one, Stacy thoroughly drove client dedication and commitment through her work where she has shown exemplary performance as demonstrated in our client growth, managed lives, and client retention”, stated LeAnn C. Boyd, Founding Partner and Chief Executive Officer of Southern Scripts.

Stacy was also the recipient of the 2017 Louis Award, an honor that recognizes Southern Scripts’ employee of the year.

Stacy is originally from Benton, Louisiana and attended Benton High School. She later earned her bachelor’s degree in business administration from Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. In the community, Stacy is a sustaining member of The Service League of Natchitoches, a non-profit women’s organization that fosters interest among its members in the social, economic, educational, civic, and cultural conditions of the community. In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her family, reading, and traveling.


JOHNSON TO HOST THREE TOWN HALLS NEXT WEEK

U.S. Representative Mike Johnson (LA-04) will host three town halls next week in Natchitoches, Evangeline and Red River Parishes. These events are open to the press. Please contact Ainsley Holyfield if you plan to attend.

Natchitoches Parish Town Hall

WHERE:
Natchitoches Municipal Building
560 2nd Street
Natchitoches, Louisiana 71457

WHEN:
Monday, July 1, 2019
10:30 – 11:30 a.m. CT


Evangeline Parish Town Hall

WHERE:
Turkey Creek Town Hall
7711 US Hwy 167 N
Turkey Creek, Louisiana 70585

WHEN:
Monday, July 1, 2019
4:30 – 5:30 p.m. CT

Red River Parish Town Hall

WHERE:
Red River Parish Library
410 East Carroll St.
Coushatta, Louisiana 71019

WHEN:
Tuesday, July 2, 2019
2:00 – 3:00 p.m. CT

Please note, in order to protect the safety of all attendees, security will be present at all town hall events. No signs or obstructions will be permitted inside any of these events.


UPDATE: NPD Arrests Suspect on Shots Fired on Abbie Dr.

During the early morning hours of Friday, June 26, 2019, the Natchitoches Police Department’s, Criminal Suppression Unit (CSU), initiated a pursuit at 0216 Hrs. in reference to the wanted suspect, Valere Frazier, with the combined efforts of on duty shift officers Mr. Frazier was taken into custody and later transported out to the Natchitoches Parish Detention Center.

Valere DeWayne Frazier, West Lawn Dr., Slidell, LA, Black, Male, DOB: 8/21/1986, 33 years of age. Frazier was arrested on 3 counts of Attempted Second Degree Murder, 1 count of Resisting an Officer, 1 count of Possession of firearm or carrying concealed weapon by a person convicted of certain felonies.

Shortly after 1:00 PM on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 Natchitoches Police Department responded to shots being fired near the 700 Block of Abbie Dr. Units from the police department immediately responded to the scene discovering the suspect which led to a foot pursuit. Officers then reported seeing the suspect dive into Cane River Lake to evade capture. The Natchitoches Sheriff’s Office along with the Louisiana State Police and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries responded to the area to assist in locating the suspect who was identified by witnesses.

Valere DeWayne Frazier, West Lawn Dr., Slidell, LA, Black, Male, DOB: 8/21/1986, 33 years of age. Frazier is wanted as the primary suspect in an active aggravated assault case and currently has active warrants for his arrest through the Natchitoches Parish Sheriffs Office. Frazier remains at large and is considered; armed and dangerous.

This investigation remains under current investigation however, the Natchitoches Police Department is urging any citizen with information in reference to this incident to please contact the Natchitoches Police Department directly at (318) 352-8101 or you may contact Lt. Commander Jeff Townson of the Natchitoches Police Department’s Criminal Investigation Division at (318) 357-3852. All calls shall be kept confidential.


NPD asks Retailers and Citizens to Check Currency

The Natchitoches Police Department is urging both consumers and retailers to be vigilant due to reported incidents which reveal that counterfeit currency has been used or has been attempted to be used within our community.

As a consumer and/or retailer you or your employees must be able to readily identify counterfeit currency. Counterfeiters may employ a less sophisticated method and print their own currency on paper that may react with a counterfeit bill identification pen or not illuminate properly under an Ultra Violet (UV) lamp.

However, everyone should be cautious because counterfeiters can purchase realistic currency via the internet. The bills in-question are usually of a higher denomination such as hundreds ($100) or twenties ($20), however they are easily identified through a brief inspection of the bill. The bill may contain Asian Symbols or be tagged as Movie Prop Currency, etc., which clearly indicates that the currency is counterfeit.

In addition, most counterfeiters wait until retail clerks are busiest and they count on the clerk not properly inspecting the bill or currency. Therefore, each retailer should provide information to their employees which shows them how to readily identity counterfeit currency. Furthermore, all consumers must also be vigilant because the counterfeit currency that goes past a retail clerk may be passed to you in the form of change.

Any retailer or citizen who thinks they’ve received counterfeit currency may call the Natchitoches Police Department directly at (318) 352-8101. All calls shall be kept confidential.


NPD Investigates Shooting on Berry Ave.

On Friday, June 28, 2019 around 1:33AM the Natchitoches Police Department responded to the 1400 Block of Berry Ave. in reference to a reported shooting. Units from the police department immediately responded to the scene discovering a male subject, Marcus Beaudion, located in the roadway in the 1100 Block of Berry Ave. Mr. Beaudion was still conscience after having sustained a gunshot wound to the face and was transported the Natchitoches Regional Medical Center and later transferred to Rapides Medical Center where he is listed in stable condition.

This investigation remains under current investigation however, the Natchitoches Police Department is urging any citizen with information in reference to this shooting to please contact the Natchitoches Police Department directly at (318) 352-8101 or you may contact Detective Rudolph Glass of the Natchitoches Police Department’s Criminal Investigation Division at (318) 357-3878. All calls shall be kept confidential.


Campbell Delivers More Valley Aid to NSU

Public Service Commissioner Foster Campbell has presented an additional $75,000 in aid to Northwestern State University arising from the purchase of the Valley Electric Membership Cooperative by SWEPCO in 2010.

Campbell on Friday presented NSU President Chris Maggio with a check for $75,000 to supplement $231,000 already donated by Valley/SWEPCO. Maggio said the total to date of $306,000 from Valley/SWEPCO is being used to match $80,000 in State Board of Regents funding, bringing the total budget impact on the Natchitoches school to $386,000.

NSU is using the funds for university endowments, scholarships and grants.

The Valley/SWEPCO money originates from Valley Electric capital credits accumulated over the co-op’s 70 years of service. After buying Valley in 2010, SWEPCO refunded $25 million in capital credits owed to the families and businesses that were Valley members.

“Efforts to locate co-op members who were owed money are completed,” Campbell said. “At my request the Public Service Commission has dedicated the remaining one percent of Valley capital credits to NSU,” Campbell said.

Campbell, who championed the Valley sale to SWEPCO in 2010, said former Valley members are paying 13 percent less for electricity today with SWEPCO than they were as co-op members in 2010. In addition, since the sale SWEPCO has invested nearly $100 million in tree-trimming and other improvements in the eight-parish Valley territory.

Maggio said the donation of Valley funding to NSU means the co-op continues to contribute to the wellbeing of the Natchitoches community and its university.

“Northwestern State students are the direct beneficiaries of this donation,” said Maggio. “Many of our students come from the area formerly serviced by Valley Electric. Many are first-generation students.

“These funds, which support scholarships and faculty development, will be used in the best interest of individuals pursuing the dream of a college degree.”

Malcolm Smoak, president and chief operating officer of SWEPCO, said all former Valley employees were hired by SWEPCO and are valuable members of the SWEPCO team.

“Their focus on customer service and dedication to Valley is visible each day through their hard work to deliver safe, reliable and affordable energy to our customers,” Smoak said. “Our continued investments in the power grid, our employees and the community are possible because Valley members voted overwhelmingly in 2010 to join SWEPCO.”


Northwestern State inks Greek junior national player Nikos Chougkaz

The international flavor of the Northwestern State men’s basketball recruiting class continued with the signing Greek national player Nikos Chougkaz, announced coach Mike McConathy on Friday.

Chougkaz, who joins his twin Robert in NSU’s signing class, is a 6-foot-10 guard/forward who plays on the U19 Greek national team that will be competing in the FIBA U19 Basketball World Cup in Greece starting Saturday.

“Nikos’ wingspan and skill set separates him from ordinary 6-foot-10 players,” said NSU men’s basketball coach Mike McConathy who will begin his 21st season in Natchitoches. “He is a lethal 3-point shooter, moves well without the ball and dribbles with the dexterity of most high-level guards.

“He can comfortably play almost anywhere on the floor for us, and with his 7-foot-1 wingspan, he can influence the game defensively by changing shots, blocking shots, rebounding, denying the passing lanes and switching ball screens.”

Chougkaz is one of 12 players on the U19 Greek team after he competed on the U18 squad this past season, including in the European Championship.

In two exhibition games leading up to the World Cup, he scored 14 points in 20 minutes against the USA and 11 points and three rebounds in 15 minutes against Serbia.

For a sneak peak at this future Demon, visit FIBA’s website and watch Greece’s games on their YouTube channel. Greece is eight hours ahead of Central Standard Time with Saturday’s game against the Philippines being at 12:30 p.m. CST.

“Nikos has performed well against tough competition both with his national team and club teams, and we expect him to make the transition to college faster than the average freshman,” McConathy said. “We expect Nikos and Robert to have built-in chemistry, and they will help each other transition to a new culture more easily.”

The 210-pounder played in high school at Papacharalampio Private School and on the Peristeri BC club team for three seasons.

“We are very fortunate to have landed such a high-caliber player this late in the recruiting process,” McConathy said. “As one of the most highly regarded teenage players in Greece, we became aware of his availability after we signed his twin brother Robert.

“Nikos turned down professional basketball opportunities to pursue an American education, and we naturally moved forward with him.”

The Chougkaz twins join a seven-member signing class that includes Israeli swingman Jovan Zelenbaba along with American forward Gatdoar Kueth (Iowa), guards Jairus Roberson (Texas) and Trent Massner (Iowa) and post Jamaure Gregg (Texas).


Notice of Death – June 28, 2019

NATCHITOCHES PARISH:

Mercie Dee LaCour Honore
December 22, 1946 – June 17, 2019
Service: Saturday, June 29 at 11 am at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church in Cloutierville

Maggie Elam
August 9, 1957 – June 23, 2019
Arrangements TBA

Dessie Davenport, Jr.
November 17, 1959 – June 19, 2019
Arrangements TBA

Kendall “K.D.” Hardison
March 9, 1991 – June 19, 2019
Service: Saturday, June 29 at 11 am at North Star Baptist Church in Powhatan
Interment: Lawrence Serenity Sanctum

Kendrick Mancell Williams Sr.
February 23, 1980 – June 18, 2019
Service: Saturday, June 29 at 11 am at the Winnfield Memorial Funeral Home Chapel
Interment: Springville Cemetery of Coushatta

WINN PARISH:

Mary Frances McHenry Taylor
August 08, 1945 – June 19, 2019
Service: Saturday, June 29 at 2 pm in the Winnfield Memorial Funeral Home Chapel, located at 117 MLK Drive in Winnfield

Rufus Green
August 21, 1982 – June 15, 2019
Service: Sunday, June 30 at 11 am in the Chapel of the Winnfield Memorial Funeral Home
Interment: Winnfield City Cemetery


Pieces of Our History: Everyday Natchitoches in the Early 20th Century

By Kevin Shannahan

Kevin’s Gallery

The week’s installment of Pieces of Our History comes from The Millspaugh Collection, part of NSU’s Cammie G. Henry Research Center’s amazing collections.

Giles Weedon Millspaugh was born on July 12 1901 and graduated from the then St. Mary’s Academy in 1917. He went on to obtain a degree in pharmacy from Tulane University. He is best known as the founder and long time owner of Millspaugh’s Drug Store in Natchitoches, running the store until his death in 1976. Giles Millspaugh was an avid photographer who took many of the photographs in the collection. Others were brought to him by friends, customers and visitors to his drugstore.

The photographs show a familiar world through a historical lens. There is a photo of Trinity Episcopal Church-but Second Street is unpaved and there is a cart being pulled by a team of oxen in front of the church. It was taken in 1909.There is a photograph on a 1906 May Day procession in front of Immaculate Conception Church and another shot of the church taken in 1898. Cattle grazing on the riverbank, a flooded second street and a group of men pushing a stuck car out of the way in 1954 are all part of the gallery. Take a look and see your city in a different light!


Northwestern State names football press box after SID Ireland

By Matt Vines, NSU Sports Information

Longtime Northwestern State scribe Doug Ireland spent countless fall nights on the Turpin Stadium press level, feverishly recounting the latest Demon football contests.

Now, that press area high above the Turpin turf will bear his name.

Starting in the 2019 football season, media will compose their own NSU football articles on the Doug Ireland Media Level of Turpin Stadium after the Louisiana Board of Supervisors approved the measure (Thursday/Friday) in their June meeting.

“Doug is truly deserving of this special recognition,” said Jerry Pierce, vice president for external affairs. “He has promoted Northwestern’s sports programs effectively for three decades through extensive media initiatives, and it is appropriate for the name of the media area of the stadium press box to reflect his immeasurable contributions to the university.”

NSU director of athletics Greg Burke, who has been a part of the Demon athletics department for most of Ireland’s 30 years, said honoring Ireland in a visible way is an easy decision.

“It is appropriate and fitting for Doug to be honored in this enduring manner as an illustration of the lasting mark he leaves on the NSU athletic program after so many years of service and dedication,” Burke said.

A 1986 broadcast journalism graduate from Northwestern State, Ireland returned to his alma mater in January 1989 and began a three-decade career promoting NSU’s 14 intercollegiate teams.

Armed with nearly a decade’s worth of experience in newspapers and as an assistant sports information director at UL Lafayette, Ireland quickly put his stamp on NSU athletics. His 1992 football media guide earned “Best in the Nation” honors in the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) ranks from the Collegiate Sports Information Directors of America.

The award-winning sports information director took home 33 Louisiana Sports Writers Associations honors just since 2000, including the 2017 LSWA Story of the Year.

The majority of those honors came from telling the stories of Northwestern State athletes, coaches and support staff members.

He’s tutored a wide range of sports information protégés, including directors at Kansas State, McNeese and Northwestern State, an associate commissioner of the Southland Conference with others that have worked at LSU, Vanderbilt and Penn State among other institutions and various publications.

Ireland’s career has had many branches and a vast impact, including his volunteer role as chairman of the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame, housed in Natchitoches.

His friendly face greeted numerous Louisiana Sports Hall of Famers and has been part of a weekend experience that has hall of famers returning each year for a new class of inductees.

CREDIT: NSU Photographic Services


NSU athletics staff set for traditional yard sign delivery on Cane River

One of the newest traditions associated with Northwestern State football takes place Friday afternoon.

For the fourth straight summer, Northwestern State athletic department staffers and football coaches will float down the Cane River, delivering distinctive purple, white and orange signs that will dot the yards of NSU season-ticket holders as the Sept. 7 home opener against Midwestern State approaches.

The Demons staff will set sail from a pair of destinations under the directions of captains Ron McBride and Jim Sandefur to decorate lawns along Cane River, celebrating the opening of head coach Brad Laird’s second season at the helm of his alma mater.

Fans and supporters can find NSU Athletics at facebook.com/nsudemons and can follow the Demons on Twitter (@NSUDemons) and Instagram (NSUDemons).

To purchase NSU football season tickets call 318-357-4268. The Demons will play five home games this season – Sept. 7 against Midwestern State, Sept. 28 vs. Southeastern Louisiana, Oct. 19 vs. Central Arkansas, Nov. 9 vs. Lamar, and Nov. 21 vs. Stephen F. Austin.

All five home contests will kick off at 6 p.m. The Demons open the season Aug. 29 at UT Martin in a 6:30 p.m. Thursday night matchup.


40th Annual Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival set for July 26-27

The 40th Annual Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival will be held on July 26-27in air-conditioned Prather Coliseum located at 220 South Jefferson Street at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches. The Festival will be on Friday July 26 from 4:30 p.m. until 10:00 p.m and all day on Saturday July 27 from 8 a.m until 10:30 p.m. The family-oriented festival is wheelchair accessible. The Southeast Tourism Society (STS) has named the Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival as one of the STS Top 20 Events in the Southeast for July 2019. The 2019 Festival theme is Vive la Louisiane!

“This year’s theme acknowledges the ways in which so many outstanding artists young and old are tapping into the power and artistry of the old ways, revitalizing and reimagining tradition as they make it their own,” said Dr. Shane Rasmussen, director of the festival and NSU’s Louisiana Folklife Center.

Blues guitarist and singer Tab Benoit is the honorary chair of the festival and will be the headline performer on Saturday evening. Benoit will be also inducted in the Louisiana Folklife Center Hall of Master Folk Artists.

“It is our honor to recognize Tab Benoit as an incredibly exciting musician, whose distinctive sound captures the vibrancy of Louisiana’s traditional culture,” said Rasmussen. “Louisiana music is alive and well because of artists like Mr. Benoit who inspire others to follow in his steps.”

Friday evening features a dance, with free Cajun dance lessons, traditional Cajun music by the Bruce Daigrepont Cajun Band, classic country with Gal Holiday and the Honky Tonk Revue, folk music by Ed Huey, blues by Cane Mutiny, gospel music by Joyful Sounds and world music by 50 Man Machine.

The festival offers three stages of music on Saturday, with free Cajun, line and zydeco dance lessons, blues music by Benoit, Cajun music by Jamie Berzas and the Cajun Tradition Band and the Bruce Daigrepont Cajun Band, zydeco by Wayne and Same Ol’ 2 Step, and French Creole la la music by Goldman Thibodeaux and the Lawtell Playboys. There will also be bluegrass by the Stewart Family Bluegrass Band, Native American dances by the Canneci N’de Band of Lipan Apache, a Jerry Lee Lewis tribute by Brandy Roberts, traditional Americana music by The Rayo Brothers, Celtic music by the Kitchen Session of Baton Rouge and a special performance by the Louisiane Vintage Dancers. Friday and Saturday will also feature acoustic open jam sessions, as well as numerous food vendors. Saturday’s outdoor activities include demonstrations of traditional blacksmithing, black pot cooking, flint knapping and the use of Southern stock dogs. A child friendly hands-on demonstration of a 19th century wash day will also be presented.

The Annual Louisiana State Fiddle Championship will also be part of the Festival. The Fiddle Championship will be held July 27 at 1 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. There will be a non-championship class and a championship class. A twin fiddle category will also be held. Registration is at noon in the first-floor foyer outside Magale Recital Hall. The Fiddle Championship winner will perform on the main stage in Prather Coliseum at 4:30 p.m.

The Festival includes several opportunities for patrons to engage directly with Louisiana folk culture. On Saturday July 27, Berzas and Daigrepont will conduct a Cajun accordion workshop. Participants in this interactive workshop will learn and trade tricks, techniques and theories with these master artists. Participation in the Cajun accordion workshop will be free for members of the Festival audience.

“The Festival attempts to bridge the distance between artists and the Festival patrons, thus breaking the artificial barriers between artists and audience,” said Rasmussen. “Rather than watching from the sidelines, everyone who takes part in these activities will share and engage in Louisiana’s rich culture.”

Narrative sessions on Saturday will include John Wilson performing Louisiana tall tales, members of the Louisiane Vintage Dancers discussing 19th century fashion in Louisiana, an introduction to Native American Choctaw traditions, and music informances by Holiday and the Rayo Brothers. In addition, Benoit will discuss his life bringing the Delta blues to audiences throughout the world, and will also explain the work of his foundation, The Voice of the Wetlands.

More than 70 crafts vendors have been invited to display their traditional work on Saturday and discuss their work with those attending the Festival. Craftspeople are expected to display beadwork, baskets, cowhide chair covers, alligator jewelry, Pysanky eggs, Native American crafts and pottery. Other expected craftspeople will display filé making, needlework, wood carvings, handmade toys and dolls, paintings, sculpture, homemade lye soap, spinning & weaving, handcrafted knives, handmade brooms, walking sticks, folk art quilts and more.

KidFest will once again be available on Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Kidfest is an area dedicated to child-friendly activities and is a fun way for children to examine their own cultural and family traditions as well as those from around the state.

Children 12 and under are admitted free. Tickets are $13 for a two-day pass, available in advance only, or $10 at the door for all events on Saturday, or $6 for a one-time evening pass to all events after 5 p.m. For advance tickets or more information, call (318) 357-4332 or email folklife@nsula.edu

Support for the Festival is provided by grants from the Cane River National Heritage Area, Inc., the City of Natchitoches, the Louisiana Division of the Arts Decentralized Arts Fund Program, the Louisiana Office of Tourism, the Natchitoches Historic District Development Commission, the National Endowment for the Arts, the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Foundation and the Shreveport Regional Arts Council.